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Number partition problem discussed in sci.math

I recently got interested in the Number Partition Problem in complexity theory, in theoretical computer science.

The general case can be described in the following story:
Someone has five, ten, 15, 20 or more index cards, with each index card carrying an integer greater or equal to zero. Suppose the man or woman wants to separate the, say, 20 index cards into two piles called Pile A and Pile B, so a to get the total of the numbers on the index cards in Pile A as close as possible to the total of the numbers on the index cards in Pile B…
What are good ways to proceed?
The measure of “good fit” for an arrangement of the 20 cards into Piles A and Piles B is simply the difference between the total of the numbers on index cards in Pile A , and the total of the numbers on index cards in Pile B, in absolute value.

The particular problem I got interested in arises from considering the succesive blocks of 5 digits in the decimal expansion of pi, after the decimal point, as corresponding in an obvious way to a sequence of non-negative integers between 0 and 99,999 .
I asked: How many of these consecutive blocks do we need, starting with the block 14159 , so that we can make two columns A, and B from the numbers, using eahc block once and only once, so that the totals in Columns A and B are the same, for the right arrangement/partition?

I managed to do it using the first 20 blocks of 5 digits from pi, and the solution can be described by putting positive or negative signs in front of the 20 numbers; the result of this combination of additions and subtractions turns out to be zero:

Witness:

? 14159-26535+89793+23846-26433-83279+50288-41971+69399+37510+58209+74944-59230-78164+6286-20899-86280+34825+34211-70679

%4 = 0

// Computation done using the PARI gp Calculator.

For reference, the sci.math newsgroup discussion thread can be found at Drexel University’s Math Forum at the Url copied below:

http://mathforum.org/kb/message.jspa?messageID=9887564

In one of the sci.math articles in the discussion thread, Richard Tobin gave the number of essentialy different solutions using block counts N varying from 1 to close to 84. What is meant by essentially different is that by inverting all signs in a solution, we agree that the resulting solution is “essentially the same”. It turns out that for a block count of N = 20, there is essentially a unique solution (see PARI/gp input and output above).

Richard Tobin’s computational data is at the URL below:

http://mathforum.org/kb/message.jspa?messageID=9888284

I used the data provided by Richard Tobin to plot the number of solutions as a function of the block count N; values of the block count N for which no solution giving a total of zero exists are expurgated, so that we can put the number of solutions on a logarithmically scaled Y-axis.

Figure drawn based on Tobin’s computations appears below:

pipartRT

Number of solutions as a function of the block count N . Credit: Richard Tobin

 

====================================

added March 24 2016:

 

I used my computer and the PARI/gp calculator to find a solution for an analogous problem where, instead of 5-digit blocks from Pi, we use 7-digit blocks.

In the sci.math newsgroup thread I mentioned above in this blog post, Richard Tobin has already given a number of essentially different solutions using a block count of N = 28.

I’ll give the solution I found for 7-digit blocks and a block count of N = 28 both as a string of signed numbers on one line, and as a column of signed numbers:

1415926-5358979+3238462+6433832+7950288-4197169+3993751- 582097-4944592-3078164- 628620-8998628- 348253-4211706-7982148- 865132+8230664-7093844+6095505-8223172+5359408+1284811+1745028-4102701+9385211+ 555964-4622948+9549303

= 0.

 

 

and:

 

1415926

-5358979

+3238462

+6433832

+7950288

-4197169

+3993751

– 582097

-4944592

-3078164

– 628620

-8998628

– 348253

-4211706

-7982148

-865132

+8230664

-7093844

+6095505

-8223172

+5359408

+1284811

+1745028

-4102701

+9385211

+ 555964

-4622948

+9549303

=======================

0

Written by meditationatae

March 24, 2016 at 8:21 am

Posted in History

Carbon copy of 2048-bit modulus in my tweet:

Can you factor the number below, which is
approximately: 2.8741 E+616 ?

287410834156300052556904804691078353698737912893647595888774
771131466552264089187801121082955058042650148628480908657584
209679932627975079507526533948828969670586042272019385974143
680211956354499018108499118029398078198323384262173379874907
469725990639683890450316543176692946674213425453977944329843
680713119049245037431173628706687868298518095185012643002710
551768290611949577535697024422073244610763779748898839985183
525179821082732042214146110353062373669637751058331879943710
570419208809416948210560397946430805740985762098818846165836
719099367628217626508759084103205713786462484224691149129335
79526946987609971

Written by meditationatae

March 9, 2016 at 4:59 pm

Posted in History

test …

Written by meditationatae

January 17, 2016 at 6:37 pm

Posted in History

Symbolism in James Gillray’s caricatures

This post is devoted to the caricature “New Morality” published in or around 1798 by James Gillray, a British caricaturist.

This is verbatim copy from:

“The Works of James Gillray, the Caricaturist: With the History of His Life”, edited by Thomas Wright , date unknown :

Before a rude altar stands the high-priest of the new faith. Justice,
Philanthropy, and Sensibility -after French models- are set up as
objects of worship. Justice appears as a fury, belted with Equality,
an assassin’s dagger in either hand; she is trampling on the emblematic
sword and scales. Philanthropy is embracing the whole world -that she
may devour it, she is treading down “Amor patriae” and “the ties of
nature.” Sensibility, holding Rousseau’s works in one hand, is weeping
over a dead bird, while her foot rests on the decapitated head of the
martyred Louis. The High-Priest, Stanhope, is mounted on a stool
preaching from the “Religion de la Nature.” Torches and newspaper
trumpets are borne by —

“Couriers and stars, sedition’s evening host,
Thou Morning Chronicle and Morning Post.”

The devotees of the new creed are pouring in offerings in harmony with
the doctrines of the Theophilanthropists. A huge “Cornucopia of
Ignorance,” supported by democratic imps, is discharging its
inflammatory contents. Southey, Coleridge, Lamb, &c., transformed into
asses and reptiles, are tendering odes and Republican verses. Earl
Moira is offering his sword and a motion -“Relief for Irish
Philanthropists.” Priestly (with his sermons) and Wakefield are
subscribing as representatives of the clergy. Paine, a weeping crocodile
in stays; Goodwin, Holcroft, and Williams (a serpent) are tending their
influence and voices for the occasion. The principal feature is the
homage of the great Leviathan -the Duke of Bedford. In his nose is the
hook with which “Burke brought the monster from his depths.” Thelwall,
soiled from recent peltings, is declaiming his lectures from the Duke’s
head; Fox is lending his voice’ Tierney is bringing addresses, and
Nicholls is reciting his speeches. Whitbread, the patriotic brewer,
represented as a barrel of his own “Entire”, is frothing from a perfect
“yeasty main”, in the suds of which swim the foremost Whigs as lesser
monsters in the Leviathan’s suite. Erskine is holding his “Causes of
the War;” the Duke of Norfolk is contributing “Whig Toasts and
Sentiments,” pledged in a foaming bumper; Sir Francis Burdett is holding
the “Glorious Acquittal of O’Connor;” Sir John Shuckborough appears
above the surface; Earl Derby is waving his cap; Byng is offering
“Coco’s Address to the Electors of Middlesex;” and Courtney is
displaying his “Stolen Jests on Religion.”
from:

The Works of James Gillray, the Caricaturist:
With the History of His Life

edited by Thomas Wright

Written by meditationatae

December 24, 2015 at 11:50 am

Posted in History

Verbatim output of running `make check’ on a build of Matz’s Ruby 2.2.3 of August 18, thereabouts …

Without further ado,

I built Ruby 2.2.3 from Yukihiro Matsumoto latest tarball at:

https://www.ruby-lang.org/en/news/2015/08/18/ruby-2-2-3-released/ (I Think).

It’s the usual
$ make
# make install

routine.

Before installing, it’s recommended by many to
to tests that come with the `tarball’, just after the

$ make

command, which compiles and builds all that’s needed.

It’s as simple as this:

(1)

$ ./configure

(2)

$ make

(3)

$ make check [ Enter ]

Below the line is that command and all the output, verbatim.

It looks good.

d.b.

Sun Oct 25 02:04:51 EDT 2015

______________________________________________________________________________________________

[david2@localhost ruby-2.2.3]$ make check
CC = gcc
LD = ld
LDSHARED = gcc -shared
CFLAGS = -O3 -fno-fast-math -ggdb3 -Wall -Wextra -Wno-unused-parameter -Wno-parentheses -Wno-long-long -Wno-missing-field-initializers -Wunused-variable -Wpointer-arith -Wwrite-strings -Wdeclaration-after-statement -Wimplicit-function-declaration -Wdeprecated-declarations -Wno-packed-bitfield-compat -std=iso9899:1999
XCFLAGS = -D_FORTIFY_SOURCE=2 -fstack-protector -fno-strict-overflow -fvisibility=hidden -DRUBY_EXPORT -fPIE
CPPFLAGS = -I. -I.ext/include/x86_64-linux -I./include -I.
DLDFLAGS = -fstack-protector -pie
SOLIBS = -lgmp
Using built-in specs.
COLLECT_GCC=gcc
COLLECT_LTO_WRAPPER=/usr/local/libexec/gcc/x86_64-unknown-linux-gnu/4.9.2/lto-wrapper
Target: x86_64-unknown-linux-gnu
Configured with: /home/david2/GNU_SOURCE/gcc-4.9.2/configure –enable-languages=c,c++,fortran –with-fpmath=sse –with-long-double-128 –disable-multilib
Thread model: posix
gcc version 4.9.2 (GCC)
making enc
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3′
make[1]: Nothing to be done for `enc’.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3′
making srcs under enc
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3′
make[1]: Nothing to be done for `srcs’.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3′
generating transdb.h
transdb.h unchanged
making trans
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3′
make[1]: Nothing to be done for `./enc/trans’.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3′
making encs
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3′
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3′
generating makefile exts.mk
Failed to configure -test-/win32/console. It will not be installed.
Failed to configure -test-/win32/dln. It will not be installed.
Failed to configure -test-/win32/dln/empty. It will not be installed.
Failed to configure -test-/win32/fd_setsize. It will not be installed.
Failed to configure dbm. It will not be installed.
Failed to configure gdbm. It will not be installed.
configuring ripper
Failed to configure tk. It will not be installed.
Failed to configure tk/tkutil. It will not be installed.
Failed to configure win32. It will not be installed.
Failed to configure win32ole. It will not be installed.
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3′
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/array/resize’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/array/resize’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/bignum’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/bignum’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/bug-3571′
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/bug-3571′
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/bug-3662′
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/bug-3662′
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/bug-5832′
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/bug-5832′
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/bug_reporter’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/bug_reporter’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/class’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/class’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/debug’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/debug’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/exception’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/exception’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/fatal’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/fatal’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/file’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/file’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/float’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/float’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/funcall’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/funcall’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/hash’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/hash’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/iseq_load’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/iseq_load’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/iter’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/iter’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/load/dot.dot’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/load/dot.dot’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/marshal/compat’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/marshal/compat’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/marshal/usr’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/marshal/usr’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/method’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/method’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/num2int’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/num2int’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/path_to_class’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/path_to_class’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/postponed_job’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/postponed_job’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/printf’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/printf’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/proc’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/proc’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/rational’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/rational’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/recursion’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/recursion’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/st/foreach’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/st/foreach’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/st/numhash’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/st/numhash’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/st/update’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/st/update’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/string’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/string’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/struct’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/struct’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/symbol’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/symbol’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/tracepoint’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/tracepoint’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/typeddata’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/typeddata’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/wait_for_single_fd’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/wait_for_single_fd’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/win32/console’
make[2]: Nothing to be done for `all’.
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/win32/console’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/win32/dln’
make[2]: Nothing to be done for `all’.
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/win32/dln’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/win32/dln/empty’
make[2]: Nothing to be done for `all’.
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/win32/dln/empty’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/win32/fd_setsize’
make[2]: Nothing to be done for `all’.
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/-test-/win32/fd_setsize’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/bigdecimal’
installing default bigdecimal libraries
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/bigdecimal’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/continuation’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/continuation’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/coverage’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/coverage’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/date’
installing default date_core libraries
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/date’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/dbm’
make[2]: Nothing to be done for `all’.
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/dbm’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/digest’
installing digest libraries
installing default digest libraries
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/digest’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/digest/bubblebabble’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/digest/bubblebabble’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/digest/md5′
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/digest/md5′
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/digest/rmd160′
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/digest/rmd160′
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/digest/sha1′
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/digest/sha1′
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/digest/sha2′
installing default sha2 libraries
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/digest/sha2′
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/etc’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/etc’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/fcntl’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/fcntl’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/fiber’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/fiber’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/fiddle’
installing default fiddle libraries
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/fiddle’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/gdbm’
make[2]: Nothing to be done for `all’.
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/gdbm’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/io/console’
installing default console libraries
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/io/console’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/io/nonblock’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/io/nonblock’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/io/wait’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/io/wait’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/json’
installing default libraries
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/json’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/json/generator’
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/json/generator’
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/david2/Downloads/ruby-2.2.3/ext/json/parser’
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Generating RDoc documentation

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test succeeded
PASS all 1010 tests
./miniruby -I./lib -I. -I.ext/common ./tool/runruby.rb –extout=.ext — –disable-gems “./bootstraptest/runner.rb” –ruby=”ruby –disable-gems” ./KNOWNBUGS.rb
2015-10-25 01:36:32 -0400
Driver is ruby 2.2.3p173 (2015-08-18 revision 51636) [x86_64-linux]
Target is ruby 2.2.3p173 (2015-08-18 revision 51636) [x86_64-linux]

KNOWNBUGS.rb PASS 0
No tests, no problem
./miniruby -I./lib -I. -I.ext/common ./tool/runruby.rb –extout=.ext — –disable-gems “./test/runner.rb” –ruby=”./miniruby -I./lib -I. -I.ext/common ./tool/runruby.rb –extout=.ext — –disable-gems”
Run options: “–ruby=./miniruby -I./lib -I. -I.ext/common ./tool/runruby.rb –extout=.ext — –disable-gems”

# Running tests:

Closed file descriptor: Bug::Marshal::TestUsrMarshal#test_compat: 7
Finished tests in 532.072637s, 29.9602 tests/s, 5417.4483 assertions/s.
15941 tests, 2882476 assertions, 0 failures, 0 errors, 40 skips

ruby -v: ruby 2.2.3p173 (2015-08-18 revision 51636) [x86_64-linux]
check succeeded
[david2@localhost ruby-2.2.3]$

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Written by meditationatae

October 25, 2015 at 6:12 am

Posted in History

The Context of George Santayana’s 1905 aphorism on History:

Context of George Santayana’s aphorism on History
=================================================

Source: (from chapter to volume to title to Edition)
CHAPTER XII—FLUX AND CONSTANCY IN HUMAN NATURE
in:

Volume One of “The Life of Reason” a.k.a.
“Reason in Common Sense” a.k.a. VOLUME I
in:

THE LIFE OF REASON (in 5 volumes)

Author: GEORGE SANTAYANA

Published:
by Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1905

Details:
Volume I of 1905 Edition listed as: ix + 291 pp.

Web Reference:
Bibliography section

in:
article “George Santayana”

in:
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

< The Text of Santayana , one sentence at a time
BEGIN >
______________________________________________________________________________________
Progress, far from consisting in change, depends on retentiveness.

When change is absolute there remains no being to improve and no direction is set for possible improvement: and when experience is not retained, as among savages, infancy is perpetual.

Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. [*****]

In the first stage of life the mind is frivolous and easily distracted; it misses progress by failing in consecutiveness and persistence.

This is the condition of children and barbarians, in whom instinct has learned nothing from experience.

In a second stage men are docile to events, plastic to new habits and suggestions, yet able to graft them on original instincts, which they thus bring to fuller satisfaction.

This is the plane of manhood and true progress.

Last comes a stage when retentiveness is exhausted and all that happens is at once forgotten; a vain, because unpractical, repetition of the past takes the place of plasticity and fertile readaptation.

In a moving world readaptation is the price of longevity.

The hard shell, far from protecting the vital principle, condemns it to die down slowly and be gradually chilled; immortality in such a case must have been secured earlier, by giving birth to a generation plastic to the contemporary world and able to retain its lessons.

Thus old age is as forgetful as youth, and more incorrigible; it displays the same inattentiveness to conditions; its memory becomes self-repeating and degenerates into an instinctive reaction, like a bird’s chirp.
______________________________________________________________________________________

< The Text of Santayana , one sentence at a time
END >

Written by meditationatae

September 15, 2015 at 5:18 am

Posted in History

Kenneth Johnston’s Unusual Suspects, Parts 4-6, Coda

part 2 of comments on Kenneth Johnson’s book “Unusual Suspects”.

Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two

There is no more sombre enemy of good art than the pram in the hall … Whom the gods wish to destroy they first call promising … I was a stage rebel, Orwell a true one — Cyril Connolly, The Enemies of Promise

RoyalExtinguishersGulliverPUttingoutPatriotsofLilliput
Isaac Cruickshank, Royal Extinguisher or Gulliver Putting out Patriots

censorship_press_obey2

Dear Friends and Readers,

This is the second half of my summary and commentary on Johnston’s Unusual Suspects (see Parts 1-4). This part of Johnston’s book will probably be more familiar territory to those who have read novels of the romantic and regency period, as well as their milieu and development (say in Gary Kelly’s survey). As women who wrote on behalf of radical ideas, 18th century versions of feminism, or reform were given a much rawer response than men, and there were automatically suspect nations (Chapters 7 & 8 of Part 4), so the novel…

View original post 4,624 more words

Written by meditationatae

August 16, 2015 at 7:31 am

Posted in History

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