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Keeping Web site passwords in text files

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On my Linux Box, I use the Firefox browser with a Master Password. Once I enter my Master Password, I can access all the saved passwords and user names for Web sites I visit. The Master Password is a good feature of Firefox. However, if one forgets the Master Password or if Firefox becomes broken, then all is lost.

Last week, on my Linux Box, I was able to run in a non-GUI environment, but I could not start the GUI of the GNOME Desktop. As a result, I couldn’t use Firefox. So I did a small installation of Linux CentOS 6.5 on a spare hard drive, and mounted the “old” hard drive. That way, I could access my Web passwords and usernames which I had saved in files within folders of my home directory.

Now, Firefox runs from the “new” disk, but I used the “old” disk to get the Web site passwords and user names.  Also, I choose my passwords carefully and they are generated with the help of “random” characters and edited in a text editor. Then, they are saved as a text file, typically “pass”.

There is a directory WordPress, one called Twitter, one called Yahoo and so on. Each directory has its file, typically “pass”, with the password for the respective Web site.

I find it convenient to safeguard my web site passwords both in text files, and within the Firefox browser, protected by the Firefox Master Password.

Written by meditationatae

October 20, 2014 at 10:59 am

Posted in History

secret 2

with 2 comments

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Written by meditationatae

October 1, 2014 at 5:52 am

Posted in History

secret

leave a comment »

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Written by meditationatae

October 1, 2014 at 5:26 am

Posted in History

Subgraph Vega module for Bash Environment Variable OS Command Injection Vulnerability (CVE-2014-6271)

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Originally posted on The Subgraph Blog:

Today, a critical and trivially remotely exploitable vulnerability was announced in bash. To help users of our Vega web application scanner to identify this vulnerability, we have a released a basic standalone module to detect this vulnerability in web applications.

The module works by testing some HTTP header values and also checks web application parameters. This should be adequate to detect this vulnerability in CGI setups where HTTP header values are turned into bash environment variables but it should also detect cases where user-supplied input is passed through functions that spawn subshells such as system(), exec(), popen() in various languages. We will refine the module as more information becomes available and we are able to test it more.

This module is a good example of the power of Vega to quickly create proofs-of-concept in Javascript using the powerful API.

The module can be obtained here. It can be…

View original 40 more words

Written by meditationatae

September 24, 2014 at 11:48 pm

Posted in History

Clean vetted C program for Collatz total stopping time records (Updated)

with 3 comments

So, I’m now advancing by 10 steps at a time by looking at the 10 least significant bits of an iterate `k’ of the starting number `n’. This is explained in some papers on verifying Collatz (look-up table method).

My look-up table is in two parts, two files of 1024 medium-sized integers, one per residue class modulo 1024, or 2^10.

I’m posting the source code here. It is faster, and gives the stopping-time to within ~= 10 iterates.

#define MAX 10000000000000000
#define MOD 1099511627776

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

int main(void)
{
long long n;
long long y[3];
long long newy1, y1rem, newy0, z0, z1, rem0;
long long newy2, y2rem, z2, rem1;
int index;
long long dd[1024];
long long ff[1024];
int steps;
double rec;
double ratio;
int j;
FILE *in1;
FILE *in2;
in1 = fopen(“/home/david/collatz/subproblem/SEPT/sept22a/ddfile”, “r”);
in2 = fopen(“/home/david/collatz/subproblem/SEPT/sept22a/fffile”, “r”);
for(j=0; j<1024; j++)
{
fscanf(in1, “%lld”, &dd[j]);
}
for(j=0; j<1024; j++)
{
fscanf(in2, “%lld”, &ff[j]);
}

fclose(in1);
fclose(in2);
rec = (double) 30;

for(n= 3743559067775 ; n< MAX; n=n+32)
{
y[0] = n;
y[1] = 0;
y[2] = 0;
steps = 0;

while(y[0]>2 || y[1]>0 || y[2]>0 )
{
index = (int) (y[0]%1024) ;

newy2 = y[2]/1024;
y2rem = y[2]%1024;
newy1 = y2rem*MOD + y[1];
y1rem = newy1%1024;
newy1 = newy1/1024;
newy0 = y1rem*MOD + y[0];
newy0 = newy0/1024;
z0 = newy0*dd[index];
newy0 = z0%MOD;

rem0 = z0/MOD;
z1 = newy1*dd[index] + rem0;
newy1 = z1%MOD;

rem1 = z1/MOD;
z2 = newy2*dd[index] + rem1;
newy2 = z2;

newy0 = newy0 + ff[index];
rem0 = newy0/MOD;
y[0] = newy0%MOD;

newy1 = newy1 + rem0;
rem1 = newy1/MOD;
y[1] = newy1%MOD;

newy2 = newy2 + rem1;
y[2] = newy2;

steps = steps + 10;
}
ratio = ((double)steps)/log((double)n);

if(ratio > rec)
{
printf(“%lld %d total steps, ratio is: %.12lf\n”, n, steps, ratio);
}
}

return 0;
}

[david@localhost sept22a]$ time ./totsptopTime93dd40mask.out
3743559068799 970 total steps, ratio is: 33.504820564191
4025611967935 880 total steps, ratio is: 30.320050817536
4163503537119 900 total steps, ratio is: 30.973200644718
4215658462911 880 total steps, ratio is: 30.271938068264
4313591831647 890 total steps, ratio is: 30.591769900798
4670866929823 880 total steps, ratio is: 30.165534251763
4733589547487 880 total steps, ratio is: 30.151747316281
4807218842719 880 total steps, ratio is: 30.135809942138
4947238968319 900 total steps, ratio is: 30.790441169684

Written by meditationatae

September 23, 2014 at 6:45 am

Posted in History

A 2048-bit (617 digits) RSA public key, can you factor?

with 3 comments

n =
2785840028567972318877793328371264295128
9579686400775596360785472462618845441045
5911740314074671419279493039672736406033
7058302794346148969461151430784604478860
8302737755893035638149922272068624160730
8509265600340926251564444455649365622976
8865184922341907053233123303032358568101
0618165796464257277453762819678070632408
3470420708019887710588821312286325461074
5189371499124215339565842925953793426320
8634002792828772169217510656239241005311
0756810253940478946614205207009623004455
3396064578711898659087590648512594248362
2981513806162241672544997253865343228332
0255826794762404803840230174943058301948
47248717881628827

Can you factor n ?

Written by meditationatae

September 23, 2014 at 5:51 am

Posted in History

Euler-Mascheroni Constant good to about 316 decimals… (cf. Knuth 1962)

with 3 comments

57721 56649 01532 86060 65120 90082 40243 10421 59335 93992
35988 05767 23488 48677 26777 66467 09369 47063 29174 67495
14631 44724 98070 82480 96050 40144 86542 83622 41739 97644
92353 62535 00333 74293 73377 37673 94279 25952 58247 09491
60087 35203 94816 56708 53233 15177 66115 28621 19950 15079
84793 74508 57057 40029 92135 47861 46694 02960 43254 21519
05877 55352 67331 39858

Written by meditationatae

September 1, 2014 at 9:19 am

Posted in History

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